Ethics

We take care to source our materials as ethically as we possibly can. It’s something which is important to us in everything that we buy, but especially when creating sacred tools. On this page we set out how we source each of the materials that we use. If you have any specific questions please do ask.

Hides

The deer hides are sourced from deer in the UK which are culled as part of the herd management process. The reindeer are sourced from the Sami tribe herders. The horse hide is from horses which have lived in the UK, who have come to the end of their life.

Crystals

The majority of our crystals are sourced from a local supplier who travels to the quarries herself to check the working conditions, and ensure that no child labour is used. The other crystals are sourced from a couple of other suppliers to whom the ethics is as equally important to them as it is to us, and we are assured again that no child labour is used.

Wooden hoops

Over this past year we have worked to ensure that our wooden hoops are made from timber sourced from sustainably managed forests. Some of our wooden hoops are made from European Ash and are assembled in Asia. We are assured that the timber used for these hoops is from sustainably managed forests but they have no certification. Progressing on from this we are now working with a local carpenter here in Lancashire who has been sourcing White Ash from America, and now we have a supply of UK Ash too. From October 2016 all of our standard hoops will be made from Ash grown in the UK.

Feathers

With our other sacred tools, we only use feathers from birds which have died naturally, either by being killed by predators, or from collision with vehicles. We never use feathers from birds which have been shot.

Local wood

When we use wood sourced locally in our sacred tool making, such as runes, oghams and drum beater handles, we connect with the tree and ask its permission before we cut.

Local sourcing

We source our materials as locally as we possibly can, and are working with local people to develop the supply chain on an on-going basis. Our new wooden drum hoops are made by a local carpenter instead of being shipped in from Asia where we sourced them previously, and we are working on sourcing local wild rabbit fur. We have found a supplier for Red Deer hides from the Lake District, and our metal rings are made by a local blacksmith. We use as many materials as we can from Anglezarke itself. Many of the feathers are from the local moorlands and woodlands, the wood used for our drum beaters and other sacred tools are from trees close to our home, and we have a farmer who provides us with our sheep wool beater stuffing.

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